Imagine...A large family of Air Sac Bird Mites crawling around in your nostrils.

Pleasant?  Well, Air Sac Bird Mites may be invading the airways of your canary bird right now...


Air Sac Mites can be devastating to your canary or other pet bird.  In a severe infestation these blood suckers will take up residence in your bird's

--throat

--lungs

--nostrils and

--air sacs. 

PLUS...

Air Sac Mites can get so numerous they'll kill your pet bird.  Use good canary care and watch for these...


Symptoms.

In a mild case your canary might...

--stop singing

--lose luster in feathers

--sit puffed up

In severe cases you'll see...

--breathing difficulties

--coughing and sneezing

--nasal discharge

--open mouth breathing

--tail bobbing up and down

--weakness

--weight loss

--loss of voice

--clicking sounds.

Eventually death by suffocation--complete blockage of the air passages--will overtake your pet bird. 

Not pleasant...and can you imagine having a family of mites living and crawling around in you nostrils? YIKES! That can't feel good.  Makes me itch just thinking about it.

Usually, symptoms such as repeated sneezing and clicking sounds will tell you that your canary has an infestation of Air Sac Bird Mites. 

So, make sure you're watching your canary's body language for any sign of a problem.

However...

There are other diseases that may cause these symptoms too like bacterial and fungal respiratory infections...so...

If possible see a vet.  He can do a tracheal swab to see what's in there...then treat accordingly.

And speaking of...


Treatment.

You may decide to take matters into your own hands as most breeders do.  If so...

Use  SCATT.   SCATT is a liquid solution containing moxidectin which attacks the nervous system of the bird mites but is harmless to your canary.

Just a drop on your birds skin will virtually eradicate any mite or lice that is feeding on your canary's blood.

Although, bird mites can be fatal if ignored...this disease is easily treated.

My experience is that 80% of the time when a canary is sneezing or clicking or breathing heavy, it's caused by Air Sac Mites.

Get some SCATT today.  If your pet canary is showing symptoms just follow the directions on the bottle.

Treat your canary every three months whether he is showing symptoms or not to keep him happy, healthy, and mite free.  I speak from experience...

SCATT has kept my aviary and canary friends completely free of bird mites.

AND...

SCATT is a very good value-->A little bit goes a long way.  One bottle will probably last several years if you have just one or two birds.

In addition to air sac mites there are scaly leg and face mites, red mites, and others.

Have you read about Scaly Leg and Face Mites yet?  Please do...these pests can do terrible things to your canary...click here.



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